Tag Archives: South African

Stuffed roast chicken for Sunday lunch

Sundays are for family. There’s nothing better than having the entire family around the lunch table. In South Africa this tradition normally involves a braai (barbeque), roast leg of lamb or as our family often does, a roast chicken with all the trimmings (think potatoes roasted in garlic and rosemary or candied thyme carrots).

Ingredients:

  • 1 whole chicken
  • 5 rashers of bacon, diced
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 can chickpeas
  • 8 sun dried tomatoes in oil
  • 2 tablespoons mixed herbs
  • smoked paprika
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 cup water

Method:

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 200C
  2. Fry the bacon in a little olive oil till brown. Add the onion, garlic, herbs, sun dried tomato and chickpeas till hot.
  3. Drizzle the chicken with some olive oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper and paprika.
  4. Stuff the chicken with the chickpea mix.
  5. Pour the wine and water in a roasting pot, add the chicken and cover with the lid.
  6. Cook at 200 for 1 hour.
  7. Uncover and transfer the chicken to grill for a further 25-30 minutes, until the juices run clear.
  8. Make a gravy out of the pan juices.
  9. Rest the chicken for 15 minutes.
  10. Cut the chicken up and pour over some of the gravy.
  11. Serve with the stuffing, some garlic and rosemary roast potatoes, candied carrots or a tomato, leafy green salad.

Chickpeas with bacon & sun dried tomato.

Note

I used a rose wine instead of white wine which made the gravy a tad too vinegary. If the wine is not cooked off enough to your taste, add a tablespoon or two of brown sugar and cook the gravy a little longer. The longer it cooks, the more the wine will cook off. The sugar definitely balances out the wine/vinegar taste.

Bobotie – the way mom used to make it

I’ve been meaning to post this recipe for ages now – Bobotie, the way my mum used to make it.

Bobotie is a classic, traditional South African Cape Malay dish consisting of spiced minced meat baked with an egg-based topping. It is traditionally served with sambal and garnished with coconut, chutney and bananas.

Growing up, bobotie was one of my favourite dishes. Unlike most kids, I actually enjoyed the spicy notes of the curry powder and the cooked raisins. My dad and my sister would always pick out the raisins from this dish – which resulted in my mom often just removing it from the ingredients all together. She would however then substitute them with some chopped apricots. Speaking of substituting ingredients, when the purse got a bit tight in the month, mom would often half the amount of mince and add about a cup of lentils instead.

If you are vegetarian, you could easily cut out the mince all together and replace it with lentils.

To this day though, whenever I find bobotie on a menu I feel compelled to try it out, just to see how it compares with this recipe. I am obviously biased, but I think this one stands up to the best of them.

PS: This is also a great dish to make as a batch and freeze for those nights you just don’t feel like cooking or if you long for that taste of home.

Enough jabber, on with the recipe.

Cooking time: 1 hour
Serves: 8
Traditional Bobotie - the way mom used to make it
Ingredients:
60ml curry powder
30ml ginger
30ml brown sugar
15ml turmeric
2.5ml salt and pepper
170g sultanas (or raisins if you prefer)
30ml apricot jam
30ml vinegar
60ml Worcestershire sauce
60ml chutney
3 big onions (chopped)
2 cloves garlic crushed
375ml milk
2Tbs butter
olive oil for frying
2 eggs
2 slices of crust-less white bread
1kg mince
couple of bay leaves

Method:

  1. Soak bread in milk
  2. Heat oil and butter in large pan and fry onions and garlic
  3. When onions are soft add curry powder, ginger, sugar, turmeric, salt and pepper and mix well
  4. Add sultanas, apricot jam, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and chutney and mix well
  5. Drain and mash bread and reserve milk
  6. Add bread to pan together with mince and cook for approximately 15 minutes until the meat loses its pinkness – this will be a fairly dry mixture, but don’t add water, just make sure the mixture does not burn
  7. Remove from stove and spoon into a greased baking dish and level the top (or divide between smaller dishes for freezing)
  8. Beat eggs with reserved milk, you should have approx. 300ml, pour over meat mixture and put a few bay leaves on top
  9. Stand dish in a larger pan of water to prevent it from drying out
  10. Bake at 180C for 40mins or until set

Serve with some yellow rice and sambal, garnished with coconut, chutney and bananas.

Crumbly pap – porridge

Crumbly pap is a nice variant to the traditional “putu pap” eaten at braais. Serve with tomato and onion gravy or with milk, sugar and a little butter for breakfast the next day.

Ingredients:

  • 500ml water
  • 5ml salt
  • 750ml Traditional Braaipap

Method:

  • Bring water and salt to the boil in a pot
  • Add pap, cover with lid and simmer for 15 minutes
  • Stir with a fork until porridge becomes crumbly
  • Simmer for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally

This recipe serves 4-6.

Putu pap – porridge

Premier Traditional Coarse braaipap Any self-respecting South African knows that a braai should never be attempted without a good serving of pap.

For the non-South Africans, pap is basically a maize porridge best served with a tomato and onion gravy.

Below is an easy pap recipe for your next braai. We normally use the Premier Traditional Coarse Braai Pap as it has proven to give us the best results without fail.

You can pick these up at your local Spar or Pick ‘n Pay.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lt water
  • 5ml salt
  • 500ml traditional braai pap

Method:

  • bring water and salt to the boil in a large pot
  • Add pap
  • stir and cover with lid
  • Reduce heat and simmer for 40mins, stirring occasionally
  • Add another 125ml cold water to pap
  • simmer over low heat for another 30mins

This recipe serves 4-6.

One last note. You’re almost assured that the bottom of the pap will burn a crust in the pot, don’t stress, this is quite normal and does not influence the taste negatively. Some would say that this is the best bit, served with a bit of butter and golden syrup/sugar. Yumm.