Category Archives: Recipes

quick pickled red onion

Pickled red onions

My grandfather used to pickle or chutney every conceivable ingredient he could lay his hands on. One of the more successful and lasting endeavours must be his pickled red onions.

pickled red onions

This is super simple and takes only 10 minutes to make. Ready to give a lift to any sandwich, or add a tart, sweet and zippy flavour to a tomato, cucumber and avocado salad or salsa. We also often have them on a grilled steak or fish.

pickled red onions

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 Tbs sugar
  • 2 tsp Maldon or Himalayan pink salt
  • 1 red onion, thinly sliced

Method

  1. Slice the onions as thinly as possible and pack them tightly into a glass jar.
  2. Mix vinegar, salt, and sugar together in a small saucepan over medium heat till dissolved. Bring to a boil.
  3. Pour the hot vinegar mixture over the onions and allow to cool to room temperature.

    Since this is not a big batch and we’re doing this in winter, the mixture tends to cool down quite quickly. So you could tuck into the pickled onions almost immediately. For best results, let it stand in the fridge for a day or two to develop flavour.

    quick pickled red onion

    While these pickled onions will last indefinitely in your fridge, I doubt it will be there for too long in any case. Next time you can play around with different flavour pairings such as red peppercorns, cloves, star anise, ginger, cumin, bay leaves or any other spice you have available.

garlic bread with rosemary and sea salt

Quick garlic bread with rosemary and sea salt

When the craving for garlic bread hits you this quick garlic bread with rosemary and sea salt recipe will fill that gap for sure.

I cannot profess to be any good at baking, in fact, I would rather steer clear of baking if I can help it. Outside of malva pudding, sticky toffee pudding, balsamic caramelised onion and blue cheese tart or breakfast pastry cups, my baking repertoire is fairly limited.

So when the craving for some home-made crusty buttery garlic bread rolls hits, you heed the call. I know it’s not LCHF/Banting friendly, but look at all the other ingredients that are good for you. Garlic is rich in several different nutrients, including vitamin C, calcium and iron while rosemary is a good source of iron, calcium, and vitamin B6. The Himalayan pink salt includes over 84 minerals and trace elements such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, copper and iron. Hmm, just look at all that calcium.

I used to be in the Voortrekkers (Afrikaans version of the Scouts) and were taught how to make potbrood (pot bread), griddlecakes (roosterkoek) and stokbrood (stick bread) – quite literally bread dough wrapped around a stick and baked on the fire. When it was ready, we would dollop some fresh butter and honey in the cavity created by the stick. The steam created inside the cavity would melt the butter and honey and every bite was heaven on earth.

Whenever we had a big family gathering we would do a traditional braai (barbeque) with loads of salads, veggies and of course garlic pot bread. The garlic bread would be baked in a cast iron pot with some medium-hot coals underneath and on top of the lid to bake as if in an oven.
potbrood cast iron bread

For the bread dough you have two options – make it yourself (full recipe below) or for a quick option, just pop over to your local grocery store or bakery and buy one of their bags of fresh bread dough. It works out to around R10 a kilo and makes enough bread to feed 8 hungry people.

Quick garlic bread with rosemary and sea salt

If you want to be a bit more rustic about it and you have the time, why not make your own. Our go to recipe is as follows:

Ingredients

  • 1 kg white bread flour (you may use brown bread , wholewheat or rye
  • 1 Tbs sugar
  • 1 Tbs salt
  • 1 Tbs instant yeast
  • 2 Tbs oil
  • approx 600ml lukewarm water
  • butter to grease
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 Tbs butter
  • Himalayan pink sea salt (or Maldon) to season

Method

  1. Combine the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl and make a hollow in the centre.
  2. Mix the oil and 600ml of the water and gradually stir into the dry ingredients with your hands (or a wooden spoon – but trust me, rather use your hands).
  3. Mix until the dough is just soft enough to be kneaded. Add a little more water if the mixture is too dry.
  4. Knead the dough (by hand) on a floured surface until soft and elastic. It takes around 8-10 min and is a good workout. Shape into a ball.
  5. Grease a large bowl with butter (or oil), place the dough ball in the bowl, cover with clingfilm and a tea towel. Leave to rise in a warm spot for about 30 minutes – it will double in size.
  6. After the initial rising, flatten the dough with your hand and with a sharp knife, divide it into 9-12 pieces.
  7. Fold the sides of each piece into the bottom to create a ball – don’t roll them. Transfer them to the large greased heavy-bottomed pot, cover with a tea towel and let it rise in a warm spot for another 20 minutes.
  8. Pre-heat your oven to 180 degrees C or get your fire ready.
  9. Chop the rosemary finely, crush the garlic and add the butter – place it in the microwave for about 30 seconds to melt the butter.
  10. Brush the dough all over with the butter, garlic and rosemary mixture. Be liberal.
  11. Crack a good amount of the Himalayan pink salt or sprinkle the Maldon sea salt over each bun – don’t be shy.
  12. Place your pot in the oven for about 30 minutes until golden on top and a knife comes out clear.
  13. If you intend on making this on a fire – place your pot in hot coals, cover with a greased lid and place more coals on the lid. Check after 30 mins until done.

Serve with a good dollop of butter, perhaps add some honey, chunky peach or apricot jam for a sweet treat. But it is perfect just with a dash of butter.
Quick garlic bread with rosemary and sea salt

Parmesan roasted brussels sprouts and sweet potato

Parmesan roasted brussels sprouts and sweet potato

Parmesan roasted brussels sprouts and sweet potato makes one of the easiest side dishes that pairs very well with most meat and chicken based meals. I know that brussels sprouts normally have a bad rap, many people don’t like them, but I hasten to bet that it is because they’ve either been steamed or boiled to death. Ever considered roasting them?

The kids love the little caramelised cabbage heads and it has become one of the staple dishes in our repertoire. The addition of sweet potato bulks up the dish a bit and adds a nice sweet note. It is pretty moreish, trust me.

Parmesan roasted brussels sprouts and sweet potato

Ingredients

  • 1 bag fresh cleaned Brussels sprouts, halved
  • 2 big sweet potatoes, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • salt and black pepper
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C. Add all the ingredients except the parmesan together in a roasting try and shake around to coat well. Add more oil if required.
  2. Bake about 25 minutes until sweet potatoes are tender and brussels sprouts are browned. You may need to turn them 10 minutes into the cooking time.
  3. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the parmesan cheese and serve.

This couldn’t be easier. You’ll probably want to double the recipe next time. Try them with bacon bits, a sprinkling of paprika or a dash of balsamic vinegar. The options are endless.

Slow braised short rib butternut puree recipe

Slow braised short ribs with butternut mash

Sundays are for…? Slow braised short ribs with butternut mash. A hearty winter warmer with fall off the bone meat and a buttery smokey honeyed butternut mash.

I always ask the guys at Country meat butchery and deli in Fourways, to cut me about 3kgs of short ribs from a full slab. I then portion them out into individual ribs, ready for braising.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

For the short ribs

  • 1.5 kg short ribs (approximately 8-12 ribs)
  • 1 onion, finely sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 leek, finely chopped
  • 1 carrot, finely chopped
  • 4 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (or olive oil)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika

For the butternut mash

  • 1 butternut, skinned and sliced into chunks
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • salt and pepper to taste

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C. Coat the beef short ribs with sprinkling of salt, pepper and smoked paprika and place in a hot frying pan with the coconut oil. Brown on all sides.
  2. Cut up the onion, carrot, leek, thyme and garlic.
  3. Transfer the seared short ribs, bone side up, to an oven roasting dish or dutch oven.
  4. Add the vegetables to the frying pan and fry for about 3 minutes. Add the sugar, pepper and soy sauce and scrape the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. After a minute or two, add the red wine and let it bubble for another minute.
  5. Pour the veggie, soy and wine mixture over the short ribs in the oven dish. Add more water just cover the ribs.
  6. Put the lid on and braise/roast the short ribs for an hour. After an hour, turn the heat down to 160 degrees C for another 2 hours.
  7. About 30 minutes before the ribs are ready, boil the butternut in salted water until soft.
  8. Drain the liquid, add the paprika, honey and butter and mash it all up. You can use a stick blender if you wish. Season to taste with salt and pepper. What you’re looking for is a buttery puree/mash with a subtle hint of smokey paprika and some sweetness from the honey.
  9. Remove the short rib from the oven and place in a roasting tray. Bump up the oven to full and grill the ribs for about 2-3 minutes – just to render and crisp up the fat.
  10. Depending on the amount of liquid left in the original oven dish, you may want to reduce some of the braising liquid.
  11. Take out the ribs, spoon over some of the braising liquid an let it rest for at least 5 minutes.
  12. Make a quick salad of chopped cucumber, tomato and avocado with a rice vinegar and olive oil dressing. This will cut through the richness of the short rib.
  13. Serve the short ribs on a bed of the mash and a spoonful of the braised vegetables and liquid.

    After this hearty meal, you will probably want to go take a nap. You deserve it.

Roast cauliflower soup recipe

Roasted cauliflower soup

Roasted cauliflower soup is currently our favourite go-to meal when we don’t particularly feel like cooking. Since it’s also winter here, few meals can beat the warm comforting taste of roasted cauliflower, mixed in with a healthy dose of roasted garlic and coconut cream.

Roast cauliflower soup recipe

For those on the Banting (LCHF) meal plan, this is a winner.

This recipe calls for roasting cauliflower and garlic in the oven for about half an hour until the cauliflower is tender and just starting to brown. This gives the cauliflower a deeper and richer flavour.

roasted cauliflower soup

While the cauliflower is roasting, soften the veggies and herbs in a pot. Add the cauliflower to the veggies with the stock and cook till soft.
Roast cauliflower soup - aromatics

Blend/puree the soup mix together with a can of coconut cream.
Roast cauliflower soup blending with coconut cream

And there you have it. Roast cauliflower soup with garlic and coconut cream.

Serves: 4 adults

Ingredients

  • 1 large head of cauliflower
  • 6 cloves of garlic, peeled
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt, ground (we use Himalayan pink salt)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, ground
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme (may use dried)
  • 4 tablespoons of coconut oil (or use olive oil)
  • 1 leek, thinly sliced
  • 3 large carrots, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 3 cups stock (chicken or vegetable)
  • 1 can coconut cream (optional but highly recommended)

Method

  1. Pre-heat oven to 200 degrees C. Break the cauliflower into small florets, removing the core and excess stems. Toss the cauliflower and garlic cloves with 3 tablespoons of the coconut oil and season with salt and pepper and place in a roasting try.
  2. Roast for 30 minutes until the florets are soft and just starting to colour at the edges. Don’t burn or over-roast the florets as this will leave a bitter crunchy taste in the soup.
  3. Cook the chopped leek, carrot, celery and thyme in a large pot with a tablespoon of coconut oil for about 10 minutes until tender.
  4. Once the cauliflower is ready, add it to the vegetables. Add the 3 cups of vegetable stock and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for about 10 minutes until all the veggies are soft and the liquid has reduced.
  5. Pour the soup mixture into a food processor or use a stick blender to puree until smooth. For a totally decadent finish, blend in a can of coconut cream (the thick stuff, unless you want to use coconut milk which makes the final product a bit more liquid)
  6. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil and season to taste




    A couple of notes. We’ve made this soup a couple of times and we all love it – even the kids ask for seconds. At first I used dried thyme, which left a few stalks in the final soup. This is probably unavoidable unless you want to go through the process of straining your soup for an even silkier finish, but I think this might be slightly overkill for a hearty soup. I prefer to use fresh thyme if available.

    A blender or stick blender seems to get better results than the food processor. If you want a smoother finish go for the blender, if you like it a little more chunky, the food processor will work perfectly.

    You can add as little or as much garlic to the roasting process as you want. We once put in a whole bulb and it was fantastic. Using about 6 whole cloves is the minimum we would use to get that nice rich flavour profile.

    Experiment to your taste and enjoy.

Barbeque sauce

Barbeque sauce

I just love this barbeque sauce. It’s quick, easy and packed with flavour. The key ingredient in this sauce is the smoked paprika – giving it a beefy, hickory smoked flavour. It makes a perfect sauce for pulled pork buns, as a marinade for steaks or chicken or just a dipping sauce for oven grilled sweet potato fries.

This recipe easily doubles, or triples up and I suggest that you do at least double the recipe – you’ll be glad you did.

Ingredients for the barbeque sauce

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion – diced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic – finely chopped
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 6 tablespoons tomato sauce

To make the barbeque sauce

  1. Heat oil in a frying pan, add onion and garlic with some seasoning and the sugar, and fry for 5 minutes until softened.
  2. Add paprika and stir to combine.
  3. Cook for 10-15 minutes until onion is caramelising, then add vinegar and let it cook out for a few minutes.
  4. Add Worcestershire sauce and tomato sauce, mix well and continue to cook for about 8 minutes until sauce has reduced.
  5. Combine the barbeque sauce with your reserved pan juices and onions from the pork roast.
  6. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Make sure that you’ve sterilised a glass jar to preserve the leftover sauce. It keeps in the fridge for a couple of weeks, but guaranteed that you’ll use it up way before then.

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Roast pork belly with fennel

I have a confession to make. I love pork belly. There are few things in life that awakens the taste buds like a crunchy crackling serving of juicy pork belly. Let’s get into it…
image

Ingredients
1.3kg pork belly roast
4 sprigs rosemary, chopped
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 lemon, zest only
1½ tbsp maldon or himalyan salt
1 tbsp olive oil
4 medium carrots
2 large fennel bulbs
4 cloves garlic
200ml white wine
squeeze lemon juice

Method
For extra crispy crackling I like to make sure the pork belly is washed and patted dry. Score the skin with a sharp kitchen knife in either a diamond pattern or thin horizontal lines. Put it in a glass tray, with another one on top, weighted down with two cans or any other heavy weight. This ensures a relatively even thickness of the pork belly. Keep it in the fridge over night.

Preheat the oven to 220C

Chop the rosemary leaves, pepper, lemon zest and salt. Rub the pork all over with the oil before rubbing the herb and salt mixture into the skin, pushing it in between the scored lines. Place the pork onto a rack in a roasting tin, skin-side up, and cook for 40 minutes or until the skin starts to puff and crisp at the edges.

In the meantime, remove the stalks of the fennel (keep the fronds). Slice the bulb into thin wedges. Flatten the garlic and remove the peel, leaving the cloves whole. Cut the carrots into quarters.

Remove the pork belly from the oven and turn the oven down to 160C. Lift the rack and add the fennel, garlic, carrots and wine to base of the roasting tin and coat with any of the pork fat drippings. Set the rack with pork back on top. Return the tray to the oven and roast for a a further hour at 160C.

Remove the fennel and carrots from the oven, squeeze over some of the lemon juice, set aside and keep warm.

Turn the oven back up to 200C. Cook the pork for another 20 minutes, or until the skin is crisped up to your liking.

Remove te pork belly, rest for 5-10 minutes and slice. Serve with fennel and carrots, sprinkling over the chopped reserved fennel fronds for garnish (optional).

You’ll love it so much, you’ll probably lick the plates clean while wishing you had bought a larger pork roast. So next time, get a 3kg roast and double the recipe. Trust me on this.

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Quick and delicious chicken soup

Chicken soup Paleo

Nico is travelling – Paris! – and the children and I are developing colds / coughs back at home. Added to that the fact that Winter is fast approaching, with a definite chill in the air, we needed something warm and healthy for dinner. Instead of heading to Woolies for a packet of pre-prepared soup I decided to up the anti and try my hand at a homemade broth. It was fun to make, Arnan was keen to help out quite a bit and it turned out to be delicious. The chicken was incredibly moist and tender when it came out of the pot. My two helpers just about gorged themselves on juicy pieces of chicken before I could even get it back into the broth! A winner all round.

Notes:

  • I used our electric pressure cooker for this recipe, if you want to use a stove top pressure cooker you can get directions from the original recipe here.
  • The original recipe called for egg noodles. Since we are following a Banting (LCHF) diet I simply omitted them.
  • This recipe is adapted from Democrat & Chronicle.

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp unflavoured coconut oil or any other vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced (I used 2 of those giant cloves Pick n Pay sell)
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme or 1 tsp chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 8 cups water
  • 4 carrots, grated on thick grate
  • 2 celery ribs, thinly cut
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 whole chicken, 1.4 kg – 2.3 kg, giblets discarded
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh parsley

Method:

  1. Set the pressure cooker to the “Sauté” setting and heat the oil until shimmering
  2. Add the onion and sauté until softened, about 5 minutes
  3. Stir in the garlic and thyme and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds
  4. Stir in the water, carrots, celery and soy sauce
  5. Season the chicken well with salt and pepper and place, breast side up, in the pot
  6. Put the lid on and lock into place, making sure the valve is set to “Pressure”
  7. Set the pressure cooker to the “High Pressure” setting for 20 minutes. If your chicken is larger than 1.8 kg then you will need to add about 10 minutes to the cooking time
  8. When the timer signals the end of the cooking time switch the pressure cooker off, ensuring it doesn’t switch to the “Warm” setting or your chicken may overcook, and use the quick release valve to relase the pressure. Carefully remove the lid, allowing steam to escape away from you.
  9. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board and shred the meat into bite-sized pieces, discarding the skin and bones – two forks work well for separating the meat, it came out so tender the meat literally just fell off the bones.
  10. Stir in the shredded chicken and parsley
  11. Season to taste with salt and pepper. If you like you could add a little soy sauce and some fresh chopped chillies

The children requested chicken soup for breakfast this morning. If that’s not a testimony to how good it is then I don’t know what is!

pulled pork sliders Paleo

Pulled pork sliders with sweet potato buns

pulled pork sliders Paleo

I have a soft spot for anything with pulled pork in the title. I’ve eaten some of the best pulled pork at the Pitt Cue Co in Soho London. While I managed to get their cookbook to try and recreate their sublime dish at home, it is quite a lengthy process as it involves a number of sauces and a smoking process that take the better part of the week to make. The taste is completely out of this world and definitely worth your while as the sauces make up the base for many of their other dishes.

But when a pulled pork craving hits and you’re fresh out of mother sauce, you’re going to have to improvise. Below is the result of that improvisation. Bite-sized pulled pork sliders that are Paleo / Banting (LCHF) friendly, by substituting the buns with sweet potatoes. The trick though is to try and get the biggest even shaped sweet potatoes that you can find as to best mimick a mini-burger. Mine ranged between small and medium, but actually worked out perfectly well as delicious bite-sized morsels.

The list of ingredients and the three processes may seem daunting, but it’s pretty easy to make and taste delicious.

Ingredients for the pulled pork

  • 1 smoked boston butt pork roast (1kg – go bigger if you can)
  • 2 large onions – quartered
  • 1 tablespoon five-spice
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup water

Ingredients for the barbeque sauce

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion – diced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic – finely chopped
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 6 tablespoons tomato sauce

Ingredients for the sweet potato buns

  • 2 large sweet potatoes
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1/4 tsp cumin
  • 1/4 tsp smoked paprika
  • pinch of maldon salt

To make the pulled pork

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 160 C
  2. Stir together the spices and rub all over the roast.
  3. Lay the onion slices down on the bottom of the roasting pan together with the water and bay leaf.
  4. Put the roast on top of the onions, cover with lid or foil and cook for 2 hours.
  5. When done, take the roast out and shred the meat with two forks.
  6. Keep the pan juices and onions aside as we’ll combine those with the barbeque sauce

To make the barbeque sauce

  1. Heat oil in a frying pan, add onion and garlic with some seasoning and the sugar, and fry for 5 minutes until softened.
  2. Add paprika and stir to combine.
  3. Cook for 10-15 minutes until onion is caramelising, then add vinegar and let it cook out for a few minutes.
  4. Add Worcestershire sauce and tomato sauce, mix well and continue to cook for about 8 minutes until sauce has reduced.
  5. Combine the barbeque sauce with your reserved pan juices and onions from the pork roast.
  6. Taste and adjust seasoning.

pulled pork sliders Paleo

At this point you can now combine the barbeque sauce with the pulled pork.

pulled pork sliders Paleo

Method for the sweet potato buns

  • Slice the sweet potato into 1/2 cm rounds. Lay them out on a roasting tray lined with baking paper.
  • Brush each slice with coconut oil and sprinkle with the spices, flip and repeat
  • Bake at 220 C for about 15 minutes, turn them over and bake for another 15 minutes until brown on the outside and cooked through.

To assemble
Top a slice of sweet potato with some lettuce, thinly sliced tomato, a generous helping of the pulled pork and finish with another slice of sweet potato. You can of course add any other toppings of your choice, but these turned out finger-licking good.

pulled pork sliders Paleo

Slow roast leg of lamb rosemary garlic smoked paprica rub

Slow roast leg of lamb with garlic, rosemary, paprika rub

Slow roast leg of lamb rosemary garlic smoked paprica rub

There’s not much to say about a slow roasted leg of lamb. It is as classic as it gets. Comfort food at its best.

I’m getting pretty partial to smoked paprika at the moment, so most of my meat-based dishes and smoky vegetables are sprinkled quite liberally with this heavenly spice. Paprika is a spice made from ground, dried fruits of bell pepper or chili pepper varieties or mixtures thereof.

I have some Spanish smoked paprika, which is rather mild but has a distinctive oak flavour. Add to that some garlic, olive oil and rosemary and you have a winning rub.

Ingredients

  • 1 leg of lamb, approximately 1.5-2 kg
  • 4 giant garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 tbsp Himalayan salt
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 2 sprigs rosemary, chopped
  • 2 sprigs thyme, chopped
  • 2 tbsp smoked paprika
  • olive oil
  • 3-4 large sweet potatoes, cut in rings
  • garlic clove, minced
  • 1 sprig of thyme
  • 2 tbsp butter

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 160C.
  2. Rinse the lamb and pat dry.
  3. Mix all the ingredients: garlic, rosemary, thyme, paprika, salt and pepper together in a pestle and mortar. Add enough of the olive oil to make a nice thick paste. Rub over the lamb on both sides.
  4. Place the lamb into a deep sided roasting tray and add 250ml of water to the tray.
  5. Cover the lamb with foil and roast for 3-4 hours, basting from time to time until the meat is falling off of the bone.
  6. When cooked, remove the lamb from the oven and transfer to a board or plate. Cover with foil and leave to rest for 15- 20 minutes.
  7. Preserve the pan juices for your gravy.
  8. Cut up the sweet potatoes and cook in boiling, salted water. When cooked but still firm, drain in a colander.
  9. Add butter, garlic and thyme to a pan and heat till foamy. Add the sweet potatoes and fry till just brown and crispy on the outside.

Slow roast leg of lamb rosemary garlic smoked paprica rub
To serve, carve the lamb into chunks and serve with the sweet potatoes. Pour over the pan juices.

Malva pudding - traditional south african

Traditional malva pudding

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The recipe for a South African traditional malva pudding has been in our family for ages.

It is extremely easy to make and a sure treat for any Sunday lunch or whenever it fancies you really.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1.5 cups sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla essence
  • 2 Tbsp golden syrup
  • 2 Tbsp white grape vinegar
  • 2 tsp bicarb of soda, dissolved in a little water

For the syrup

  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 125 ml butter
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla essence

Method
Preheat oven to 180 degrees C. Mix all the ingredients for the batter together and add the bicarb mixture right at the end. Pour into a deep dish or 2 smaller dishes. Bake for 1 hour.

In the meantime prepare the syrup sauce by combining all the ingredients and cook over medium to low heat.

Once the malva is cooked and ready, poke a few holes in it for the sauce to seep in and cover completely with sauce.

At this point you could return it to your oven for 5 minutes to caramelise even more, but this is not necessary.

Once the malva has soaked up all the sauce, serve with cold custard and/or vanilla ice cream.

No Churn LCHF Ice cream

Salted almond butter and banana no churn ice cream

 almond butter banana no churn no cook ice cream

I’ve been wanting to make home-made ice cream for ages now, but most recipes require a key utensil, an ice cream maker.

Since I don’t have an ice cream maker, and not really looking forward to eating ice cream with a knife and fork (have you seen a brick of ice cream before?), it never seemed a likely culinary endeavour.

Even the so-called no churn recipes involved some weird ingredient which didn’t really fit in with our new LCHF (low carb, high fat) lifestyle.

Most recently however I stumbled upon a few recipes for no churn paleo friendly ice cream. These recipes sometimes have no more than two or three ingredients,  which seemed simple enough.

The key ingredient turns out to be frozen banana. Yep, no eggs, no cooking, no condensed milk or extra sugar just banana. Now true LCHF followers would shy away from bananas for their high natural sugar content, but it is ice cream we’re talking about here…

So I combined a few of these recipes and experimented with flavours to bring you salted almond and banana no churn no cook ice cream.

Ingredients
5 frozen bananas
2 tablespoons almond or other nut butter
1/2 teaspoon salt
50g dark chocolate, chopped (optional)
1 cup cream (optional)
1 hand full of almonds, crushed (optional)

Method
Chop the frozen bananas in a food processor till it starts to resemble a crumble.
Add the almond butter and the salt.
Continue to process the ice cream until creamy and smooth.
At this point I added the optional chopped chocolate, crushed almond and a cup of cream to give it an even creamier, chocolattey, nutty texture. Almost like a tin roof ice cream you get from Woolworths.
You may go so far as to swirl in a tablespoon of honey, but this defies the low sugar idea. Just make sure nobody is watching ;-)

That’s it. Scoop it in a freezable container and freeze it for at least 3 hours (that’s how long we could last waiting for it).

Best banana almond ice cream I ever tasted.